Lorde says she hates Reggae, Jamaican artists react

Never shy to speak her mind, Grammy-winning singer, Lorde says she's not a fan of Reggae musicby Jodee Brown

Reggae music is, for the most part, loved universally as one of the best and most celebrated genres. Grammy-winning singer, Lorde is not one of those lovers apparently.

The 17-year-old, New Zealand-born singer, who rose to international prominence with her hit single, Royals, was highly critical of Reggae music during a recent edition of her VEVO vlog titled, The World According To Lorde.

“I hate Reggae, Reggae makes me feel like am late for something,” she said.

Though the comment was made months ago, a report in the Jamaica STAR Tuesday brought the comment to light, triggering mixed views among Jamaican music insiders. However, Dancehall artist, Spice, whoremixed Royals in January, lambasted her upon hearing of the comment..

“I’m really disappointed in her statement, because I was such a big fan of her music, and fell in love withRoyals the moment I heard it,” she told the Jamaica STAR Tuesday. “I’m not a fan anymore, and will just delete her album and move on. Reggae is the most soulful genre, so I can’t understand how someone could hate it. I really regret even doing a reggae cover to her single. Everyone knows the origin of reggae music is Jamaica, and by black people. So my question is: Is it the music that she really doesn’t like, or just the black race?”

However, ZIP 103FM regular and selector, DJ Chrome was of a contrasting opinion.

“If that’s how she feels, then that’s OK. It’s her opinion. I personally wouldn’t say that I hate any genre of music,” he told the newspaper. “They might not be my favourite, but I wouldn’t go as far to say that I hate them. If she thinks Reggae is that bad, then it’s no big deal.”

This is not the first time Lorde has courted controversy with her comments on other genres. In an interview given to Complex Magazine last fall, saying she did not relate well to music from Nicki Minajand Drake because they ‘all sing about such opulence,’ while also saying, ‘How are we listening to this? It’s completely irrelevant.’

She later clarified her comments on Twitter, saying that loves and admires both rappers, saying, “Just because their songs aren’t my reality (being 17 and from Auckland) doesn’t mean I don’t admire their musicianship and careers!”

D’Angel, Sizzla speak out against STING ban

Sizzla and D'Angel have both taken issue with their respective bans from STING following their performances at STING 2013 in December.

Sizzla and D’Angel have both taken issue with their respective bans from STING following their performances at STING 2013 in December.

by Jodee Brown

Two days following the announcement that Reggae/Dancehall artists, Sizzla and D’Angel were banned from future editions of STING following their controversial performances at the show’s 30th anniversary, both are crying foul following their punishments.

Isaiah Laing, the show’s lead organizer, announced Tuesday that Sizzla was banned from the show for promoting ‘hate music’ during his performance, in which he repeatedly hit out against homosexuality.D’Angel, meanwhile, was banned for at least five years as a patron following her impromptu clash with Ninja Man at the Dec. 26 show, which saw her spread her legs and gyrate while wearing a short dress during her set, before giving a bizarre post-performance interview later in the night.

D’Angel defended her actions in an interviewpublished Thursday in the Jamaica STAR, saying that she did nothing out of the ordinary given the hardcore nature STING has possessed over the years, while saying she has seen artists split, gyrate and sing lyrics that could be deemed explicit, without any punishment.

“As a grown woman and an artiste, I am entitled to entertain and perform,” she said “I have been watching Sting from I was a child and there is nothing that I did on stage at Sting that was far-fetched from all the things that have happened on that stage over the years.”

“I stayed true to the culture of Sting, which is energy-packed entertainment,” she continued. “I think outside the box. I was just having fun. It was just solid and mature entertainment. The patrons enjoyed it and the fans were happy. I represented dancehall on a wider scale. My music and career is not based on one night, my career goes on after this.”

Sizzla’s publicist, Olimatta Taal responded on behalf of the Grammy-nominated singer, saying organizers should not have attempted to censor him for speaking out against issues deemed illegal in the constitution.

“It is Laing’s show but he knows the artiste that Sizzla is and he knows what Sizzla represents,” she said.“If you book him for a show, don’t censor him. If you want to fight the issue, then fight the Government…Sizzla was just expressing the values he was brought up on. Don’t censor the artiste for that.”

Neither artist indicated whether they will challenge these bans.

Mr. Vegas challenges Bounty Killer to clash at STING

Vegas-Bounty clash at STING? The two superstar deejays could be heading for a lyrical confrontation at Dancehall's largest showpiece.

Vegas-Bounty clash at STING? The two superstar deejays could be heading for a lyrical confrontation at Dancehall’s largest showpiece.

by Jodee Brown

Not known for entertaining lyrical confrontations throughout his illustrious career, Dancehall/Reggae superstar, Mr. Vegas now seeks to break this mold by challenging one of the genre’s clash kings and long-time rival, Bounty Killer at STING 2013.

On Thursday, Vegas made his intention to clash the ‘War Lord’ public and insists he will not back down from Bounty at Dancehall’s most hyped showcase.

“I just put it out there to let it be known that mi a big man now and mi nah mek nuhbody feel like dem can cow mi down,” Vegas told the Jamaica STAR.

Vegas and Bounty’s years of verbal exchanges came to a head in September after a recent performance in which Vegas donned 70s plaid clothes and a fake afro, with the ‘Grung Gaad’ and his fans ridiculing the outfit. The seemingly petty argument turned into a flat out war of words with everything being questioned, from Vegas’ sexuality to Bounty’s status within the music.

Vegas later claimed that his relationship with an ex-girlfriend of Bounty’s was the reason behind this deep-seeded dislike his fellow deejay showed towards him.

Despite having no clashing experience, Mr. Vegas says he has studied enough about the history of Dancehall and the art of lyrical warfare that gives him the confidence to clash Bounty Killer and said he would even turn down his show in Dubai, scheduled for the same day as STING, just to confront the Allianceleader.

“Clash is to entertain people with lyrics, not bag a noise and nasty mouth,” he said “So, if a man come wid some fresh new lyrics, then mi wi cancel my show a Dubai and mek Laing run back the promoter food, just to show people sey mi can tek on Goliath.”

Mr. Vegas has even gone as far as to record a diss song against Bounty dubbed Bury Him Fuss, suggesting he is ready for a clash at STING.

Bounty Killer has yet to respond to Vegas’ challenge.

Last year, Bounty Killer was at the centre of another major feud, that time with former Vybz Kartel protégé,Tommy Lee Sparta, with many rumors swirling of a clash between those two at STING. However, Bounty ended that speculation by insisting he would not be at STING and that Tommy Lee Sparta was no established enough for him to take seriously in that setting.

STING 2013, the 30th anniversary of the show, will take place at Jamworld in St. Catherine on Dec., 26.

Raine Seville ‘Mad Dem’ with new video, accuses Bugle of ruining her reputation

Raine Seville's Mad Dem has attained much buzz since its release on September 14, particularly for Raine's edgy style and content on display

Raine Seville’s Mad Dem has attained much buzz since its release on September 14, particularly for Raine’s edgy style and content on display

by Jodee Brown

Popular Dancehall diva, Raine Seville has hit out against her baby’s father and fellow artist, Bugle following recent speculation that Bugle’s chart-topping single, Nuh Compatible was aimed at her following their split.

Earlier this month, Raine unveiled the official video for her single, Mad Dem which reportedly was a counteraction to Nuh Compatible. In the single, she deejays, “See the body ya wey man comfortable, no lame man wey nuh compatible, from yu get a touch offa dis yu cudda wild like animal, mi know sey yuh have to settle.”

According to Raine in an interview with the Jamaica STAR, she did the song to show she is equipped with the looks and confidence to win over any man.

“I have a body that will make a man stay,” she said.“Persons that are saying that Raine is not compatible, that is a big misconception.”

As for her relationship with Bugle, the father of her nearly three-year-old daughter, they maintain a cordial accord for the sake of their child, but insists they are not friends, even accusing him of trying to ruin her image.

“We have a good ‘parenting’ relationship,” she said.“With all the negative energy that he is using right now to tarnish my reputation, I wish he had used the same energy to help my career for the 10 years that we were together.”

According to Raine Seville, the video has been garnering positive responses in the few weeks since its debut. The video, directed by Rawtid TV shows Raine in a more provocative, racy light, contrary to videos she has done in the past.

“The video has been receiving great reviews, it’s been a year since I have done a video so this is just a great way to show my fans just how much I have grown and become confident in my work,” she said.

This is one of several single Raine has released since the turn of the year, including You Choose andKhaki, which she sang alongside Dancehall superstar, Beenie Man as well as Sekkle Down Bodyalongside Konshens, which featured a racy set of promotional pictures leading up to its release.