Bounty Killer Warns Freaky Artistes “Don’t come nasty up di dancehall”

A 'Killa' warning for freaky artistes

A ‘Killa’ warning for freaky artistes

by Curtis Campbell (Jamaica Star)

Guinness Greatest Dancehall Icon Bounty Killer has finally broken his silence on the taboo sexual direction which dancehall has taken in recent months, courtesy of the new crop of dancehall artistes.

The likes of J Amsterdam and Alkaline are perhaps front-runners as it relates to artistes who have pushed the barriers of the sexual language in dancehall. J Amsterdam releasing a song asking females to wine in his face and Alkaline admitting that he likes the anal stimulation from a female’s tongue as ‘brawta’ in his song on So Unique record’s Igloo Rhythm.

Bounty Killer, during a performance at a recent stage show, addressed some of these issues, stating that some things are better off left in the bedroom.

He also warned females about accepting Alkaline’s reference to them as ‘john crow’ in his (Alkaline’s) Bruck Out song when he deejayed, “Tonight every gyal a tun a devil, tun a heathen, tun a john crow”.

“Dem a talk bout dancehall a get kinky, but dancehall is just getting too friendly, everybody like everybody. Me nuh like everybody, me like who me like, mi nuh likey likey, mi nuh love likes. Listen mi, a years mi a sing some type a things and mi neva cross the line. Yu neva hear mi a tell girls fi duh certain things yet, because the public is the public. Suh some bwoy fi keep dem dirty life inna dem bedroom. Don’t come nasty up di dancehall and don’t mek nuh guy tell yu fi turn a dutty devil, nuh guy nu fi tell yu fi turn nuh john crow,” Bounty warned.

“Nuh mek nuh guy come try stereotype unno. Ghetto girls keep unno head up in the sky. Because most artiste just come up yah fi get a forward and guh wey, dem nuh give unno likkle insight, likkle information or something and unno help destroy unno self sometimes,” Bounty Killer told his fans.

Kartel lost his way

The artiste who introduced Vybz Kartel to the music industry also commented on his recent predicament with the law, as Bounty says the guilty verdict was the worst thing that could ever happen to dancehall.

“One of our most promising rising champions was found guilty of murder and that is the most tragic thing in dancehall and a me did find Kartel as a likkle youth and sey come mi youth. The moment him sey daddy devil an unno happy and laugh wid him, uno help destroy him. Yow, the devil nuh duh nothing beautiful, Kartel mek him soul get caught in hell. And the devil that is what they do, destroy goodness. I wish Kartel all the best and I hope unno put all the prayers you can so the appeal will be accepted. Leave it inna the hands of the Father, God work miracles another youth from the ghetto, from the slum, the system get him. We can only say a prayer, leave it to God. The whol’ a we mek mistakes, leave it to God, di whol a wi sin already,” Bounty said.

Bounty Killer then dedicated songs The Lord is my Light and Salvation and Closer Than a Brother to the incarcerated deejay.

Barrington Levy blasts increased level of hardcore content in Dancehall

Internationally acclaimed Reggae singer, Barrington Levy points to a lack of guidance as the reason for increases 'shock value' methods employed by young Dancehall artists in their musical content.

Internationally acclaimed Reggae singer, Barrington Levy points to a lack of guidance as the reason for increases ‘shock value’ methods employed by young Dancehall artists in their musical content.

by Jodee Brown

Throughout 2014, music lovers have seen a sharp increase in hardcore sexual content and imagery within Dancehall, with the likes of Alkaline, Demarco, Ricky Carty and J Amsterdam pushing boundaries with eyebrow-raising material to gauge interest from fans. One legendary artist is sick of this growing trend.

Barrington Levy, singer of classics such as Broader Than Broadway, Under Mi Sensi and countless others says he is tired of the X-rated nature that the genre has taken on and thinks it has damaged its credibility.

In an interview published in the Jamaica Observer on Tuesday, Levy said, “I see where the music business is taking a turn for the worst. It’s going in a direction where we are losing it.”

These people have no morals anymore. Are we going to do anything for money? I never came into the music business just to sell records. I thought I would just sing for the love of it.”

In another interview with the Jamaica Gleaner, Levy was more solutions-oriented, pointing to a lack of positive influence as the reason why young artists choose to ratchet up the shock value in their musical content.

“They are surrounded by a lot of hotheads that cannot steer them in the right direction,” he said. “People are talking about them and their songs, but not in a good way. As entertainers, we need to always set a good example for the future of music.”

“Surround yourself with good people, people who will lead you in the right direction, people that will help you make good career choices that will ensure longevity and international success.”

Dancehall has long contained specks of raunchiness and hardcore sexual content throughout its near four decades of existence, with artists such as Lady Saw and Vybz Kartel bringing said content to the forefront and becoming all-time greats as a result.

In 2014, however, X-rated content has reached another level and sparked much conversation within the Jamaican music industry, with Alkaline and J Amsterdam boldly speaking on topics of anal stimulation and giving oral sex respectively, to Ricky Carty’s infamous music video for his song, Gyal Tek It in which he had sex with a woman on camera while performing the song.

Meanwhile, Levy is set to release a new acoustic album with variations of his biggest hits. He is currently promoting his new hit single, Rosie.